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Calibrating a laptop screen

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  #1  
Old 05-20-2009, 08:01 PM
babytarantula babytarantula is offline
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Calibrating a laptop screen

I know this has been asked a million times but i saw a million different answers. So my question is simple, how is the best way to calibrate a toshiba satellite screen?

I need a quick way because i have that big problem that on my screen i find my picture quite awesome but everybody else ask me if this model is green giant's daughter.

Here is the before and after retouching pics, the "after" is the problematic one.

Thanks
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 01avantgirl.JPG (97.2 KB, 87 views)
File Type: jpg aftergirl.JPG (94.1 KB, 83 views)
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  #2  
Old 05-20-2009, 08:57 PM
mistermonday mistermonday is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

Hi BabyT, I am not familiar with that particulaar model but I can tell you most laptops LCDs were not designed for image editing and most can not be calibated. They do not have the color gamut range and when you view them at an angle or pivot them up and down, the brightness changes. You typically can not trust what you see on a laptop screen. If you examine your images by the numbers in the channels, you will see that there has been ssome dramatic movement in your editing. Particularly the Blue chjannel which has been clipped and significantly darkened which explains your yellow cast. If that still looks neutral to you on your laptop screen, then you really need to get an external LCD display.
Regards, Murray
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Old 05-21-2009, 05:37 AM
Quantum3Studio Quantum3Studio is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

Mistermonday is right, but you can try with EyeOne, the hardware to calibrate screens or, buy a Apple Cinema Display, this monitor doesn't need to be calibrated, just cheked from time to time just in case the monitor got bad.
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Old 05-21-2009, 10:43 PM
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garibaldi garibaldi is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

Is that a cable or a riding crop in her mouth? laptops arent really great for accuracy due to the tonal shift and viewing angle of the screen. like the other mentioned, you cna try a calibrator, maybe even by eye with the adobe gamma utility (Do they still even have that?) but the best way is on a good monitor
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Old 05-21-2009, 10:59 PM
babytarantula babytarantula is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

Hi, it's a riding crop. Please tell me more about gamma utility thanks
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Old 05-21-2009, 11:04 PM
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garibaldi garibaldi is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

well there was a utility called adobe gamma, forgive me, I havent used it since i had ps 6 on an old dell i used to use, and it was somewhere in the control panel on a windows machine if i remember, it basically was a way to eye the display to get it more accurate by using a fixed image on the screen with bars and a slider that you kind of fudged a calibration and set the gamma of the monitor. Like I said, its been a while, and I use an eye one calibrator on my displays, but maybe try googling it or look in you control panel list for adobe gamma, so long as you are using abode products I assume.
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Old 05-23-2009, 06:35 AM
Quantum3Studio Quantum3Studio is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

Adobe Gamma worked really bad for me. Adjusting a monitor by using our eyes could be pretty tricky and you may probably end with an unbalanced monitor n that's the way Adobe Gamma works, by using our eyes for calibration. It's located in the Window's Control Panel if you want to try it, but not recommended. There are 2 types of calibration: Density (brightness/contrast) and color. The first one seems the easier, and by color is the most hardest but both are impossible to handle by using our eyes. I have tried downloading a calibrated monitor profile as well, but each monitor, whichever will be the brand, are absolutely different and ICC profiles will not work in your monitor because the use of each monitor is different and monitors are uncalibrated in millions of different ways. If you calibrate your monitor, upload a wide density range image, so we can judge if your black and white point are too intense or fine.
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Old 05-23-2009, 05:12 PM
Smashbase Smashbase is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

I use a Spyder to calibrate my laptop screen.
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Old 05-24-2009, 11:05 AM
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TommyO TommyO is offline
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Re: Calibrating a laptop screen

babyt,
Let's get back to the basics, so you may better understand why you should calibrate your laptop with an external calibration device.

First, most LCD's for the general consumer have no built-in graphics card or chip-set. Higher end models do, which is why they cost so much more. No laptop LCD's do, period; there is no point, since the laptop is physically attached and has two graphics cards built in - one for internal, one for external.

It is the graphic card (or chip-set) that gets calibrated. Each has a LUT (look up table) that converts color values sent to the card to those sent to the display. The calibration process simply zeroes out the LUT, sends known values to the chip-set and examines the output with a colorimeter. It calculates the differences and creates a new LUT that will correctly represent/convert color values as they should be seen on the display. Now, when Photoshop sends a RGB value of 243/189/187 to the display, the display will represent it as close as it can.

The down side to LCD displays on laptops are many fold. Their internal fluorescent tubes will slowly fade, like any LCD. They generally don't have as good as specifications for the angle of view, as the others mentioned - and since we love to tilt those laptop displays, it simply makes things less predictable. They also are viewed in a larger variety of lighting conditions, which are not good for doing retouch or color critical applications. Ambient light should be controlled in a color managed environment.

You may also wonder what Toshiba laptop displays' TruBright technology is. It's simply a special chemical polarizer on the surface of the display. It should not substantially effect the calibration. Many desktop LCD's include automatic contrast adjustments that must be disabled prior to calibration. Keep in mind that when you adjust an LCD's contrast, brightness or color controls you are really only adjusting two things - the LCD's florescent tube intensity and the graphics cards' LUT. Hence, you should never adjust the LCD controls after calibration - hands off. This is another down side to laptops, as we often need to adjust the brightness or contrast just to see it in certain environments.

Hope this helps you determine what to do. My recommendation after looking at your attached images - calibrate with an external device like the Spyder. Then, don't touch it.
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